INQUIRE

Inquiry

This message/comment is about: ALISON THOMAS
  SHARE

The majority of Alison’s images are based on photographs that are digitally manipulated using Photoshop and various purchased and self-created filters to give a vision of the essence of a scene rather than an exact recording of the scene.

Prices and availability may change without prior notice. A price quote alone does not constitute a hold on the item. All works remain property of the artist until paid in full.


WE ONLY FEATURE SELECTED EXAMPLES ONLINE. PLEASE CONTACT THE GALLERY FOR ADDITIONAL WORKS OR IF YOU WOULD LIKE TO BE NOTIFIED OF NEW ARRIVALS BY THIS ARTIST.

Alison Thomas moved to New Hampshire in her early twenties and in her words was “bored, surrounded by nature, and unable to find a job” It was in New Hampshire that she found her sister’s old camera that had been packed accidentally and on the same day she found the camera she also received an ad in the mail for the Time Life series of books on photography. Thomas ordered the first book, bought some Kodak Tri-X and went out to play.

While Alison was new to photography she was not new to nature. She had found solace in nature for as long as she could remember and sought to show others that same perception in her photography. Along the way, digital came of age, she got her first copy of Photoshop and she started creating both “straight” photographs adhering to truth in nature standards and digitally modified photographs that are more digital art than photography.

Thomas moved to Louisa, Virginia after 10 years in Florida and is looking forward to living more in the out of doors and finding new places to inspire her.

Alison says, “Has a neighbor ever remarked upon your garden’s beauty and your response was ‘it needs to be weeded’ or ‘I should have chosen different flowers for that spot’.  Do you have a tendency to look upon a beautiful scene and only see the flaws?

“My work stimulates the viewer to explore more deeply the way beauty is seen and experienced by removing much of the detail and leaving only the essence.  In doing so I not only show you a scene but I also draw your eye to the larger facets that can get lost in an ordinary photograph.  I encourage you to look upon the graceful arch of a single stem, the shape of a barely discernible mountain in the distance, the form in a pile of rocks.”