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Sarah Jane Stoll is a D.C. Metro area based fine artist. She has a BFA in painting from the Maryland Institute College of Art. Her work has been exhibited in New York, Boston, Baltimore and publications such as the Guide Artists Magazine and Studio Visit. Her artwork investigates dream realms, myth, horror, and symbols of nature.

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Sarah Jane was raised in the rolling hills of Connecticut in an area known as The Last Green Valley. Her father and mother, who was also an illustrator, encouraged her to concentrate on art at an early age. She was inspired by the New England scenery and the old Faery Tale Illustrations of Edmund Dulac.

In 2013, Sarah Jane attended PrattMWP College of Art and Design to pursue a career in illustration. During her foundation year, she discovered a newfound love of painting, particularly the techniques of the post impressionist John Singer Sargent. She transferred to the Maryland Institute College of Art in the fall of 2014 as a painting major.

While studying at MICA, Sarah Jane explored indirect and alla prima painting techniques. That fall, her father fell into a coma and awoke after six days with permanent brain injury. The tone of Sarah Jane’s work developed to reflect a sense of her family’s trauma. To evoke this, she uses a variety of tools, such as squeegees and rollers, to create distortion and other desired effects.

Sarah Jane’s artwork delves into dream realms, mythological archetypes, cinematic horror, and symbols of nature. Intrigued by the uncanny and ephemeral quality of dreams, this influence is exhibited in the moments of realism that dissipate into a disorder of blurs and fragments. Figures become intangible, melting, phantom-like forms. Throughout her work, there is an emphasis on figures and their relation to an environment of painterly abstraction.